Assistive Technology

Assistive Technology

The Monroe County Intermediate School District (MCISD) recognizes that assistive technology can eliminate barriers and enable students with impairments to be participating and contributing members of society.

We believe that all students with impairments in Monroe County are entitled to equal access to the technology needed to ensure appropriate educational opportunities.

What is Assistive Technology?

Assistive technology (AT) device means any item, piece of equipment, or product system, whether acquired commercially off the shelf, modified, or customized, that is used to increase, maintain, or improve the functional capabilities of a child with a disability. The term does not include a medical device that is surgically implanted, or the replacement of such device.

Assistive Technology Guidelines

The Guidelines for the Provision of Quality Assistive Technology Services: A Plan for Region IV serves as the framework for districts, counties, and schools to use as they develop and refine their Assistive Technology Service.  The plan reflects No Child Left Behind and IDEA 2004. In addition, it incorporates the principles of Universal Design for Learning and integrates Quality Indicators for Assist

PDF DocumentAT Consideration Process Guide

External LinkAssistive Technology Staff Forms (sign-in page)

Assistive Technology Procedures

  1. Complete AT Consideration Process Guide  with the IEP team to decide if AT is required. Review the consideration outcomes and decide whether or not assistive technology is required.
  2. If potential assistive technology solutions are not known to the IEP team, the IEP team may contact the assistive technology consultant/committee who can assist the team in addressing assistive technology or refer the student for an assistive technology evaluation. A trial use period may be recommended at the end of the consultation or evaluation. To contact the assistive technology consultant, complete the Consultation Request Form.
  3. If potential assistive technology solutions are known to the IEP team, trial use of the identified assistive technology solution may be documented in the IEP and implemented. To complete a trial of assistive technology, complete the Assistive Technology Trial Request Form.

  4. If you’ve determined that the student accomplishes the required tasks within the relevant instructional or access areas with assistive technology that has been determined educationally necessary and is currently in place, then document required assistive technology devices and services in the IEP.  Complete and/or update the Assistive Technology Plan.

Find self-paced learning tutorials, hands-on activities, how-to videos, and resources to build technology skills including free learning modules and professional development courses.  Learn about a variety of topics that promote best practices. For more information on assistive technology tutorials, augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) apps and software, core vocabulary resources/activities, switch access, and visual impairment apps and software, visit Resources and Information.

The Instructional Resource and Technology Center (IRTC) has a lending library of materials available to students attending schools within Monroe County. The IRTC loans both low-tech and high-tech devices in the following categories:

Communication

Computer Access

Daily Living Aids

Hearing & Listening Aids

Learning

Software

Switches

Vision Aids

Assistive Technology equipment can be checked out after completing the AT Consideration Process Guide.

AT Journey: Web Edition

Self-paced | Online

This journey is designed for individuals and school teams to learn more about assistive technology while examining their current practices. The journey will assist you with:

  • Beginning to develop a successful, team-based model to effectively deliver AT services to their students

  • Understanding and navigating the intersection of AT, Ed Tech, IT (information technology) and UDL (universal design for learning)

  • Promoting a learning, sharing, and capacity-building community by eliminating information silos.

You’ll be able to go at your own pace. Each step will contain videos, resources, and helpful hints to help your team move toward a collaborative AT process and ultimately get the appropriate assistive technology (AT) into the hands of students in a more efficient and effective manner. 

Cost: Free

Presenter: Carolyn O'Hearn and Mike Marotta

Level: Beginner

 

Putting Aided Language Input into Practice

January 13, 2021| 12:00 PM EST | 60 minutes |  FREE |  Beginner

Communication is a two-way process. As such, the successful implementation of an AAC device depends as much on the skills of the person using AAC as it does on those of the communication partners. This session will provide an overview of the characteristics, roles, and responsibilities of communication partners working with people who use AAC, with a focus on aided language input. Aided language input is a strategy in which the communication partner uses AAC to teach AAC. Shared reading will be discussed as a vehicle for learning to use aided language input to support device implementation and facilitate language learning. Participants will have the opportunity to put it to practice through a hands-on activity.

 

Implementation: Adoption vs. Abandonment

January 14, 2021 | 12:00 PM EST | 60 minutes

You have met your client, analyzed their strengths and weaknesses, maybe you did a nice SETT process…you found a tool. Now what? How do you promote use and success of the tool you worked hard to find? This session will review some of the evidence bases which identify factors which predict adoption or abandonment of tools. Come learn what can be done from assessment to receiving equipment to help increase success.

Cost: Free

Presenter: Sayard Bass, M.S. CCC-SLP/L-ATP

Level: Beginner

 

Stepping Stones to AAC: Dreams! 

January 27, 2021| 8:00 PM EST | 30 minutes |  FREE |  Beginner

Language learning occurs in steps. As a communication partner, you are crucial to helping your child develop language and communication. You model language for your child during daily activities, you respond to your child’s attempts to communicate, and you help them learn to say words in a more efficient way. But what do these steps look like when it comes to Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC)? We will explore three simple steps, with different everyday activities, to help you and your child learn to use his/her device more effectively at home: choosing words, planning a question or comment, and modeling on the device.  During this session we will outline these steps during a routine such as talking about dreams, and describing your child’s traits. Join us for an interactive session to help you and your child step into AAC.

 

Stepping Stones to AAC: Shapes and Colors!

February 10, 2021| 8:00 PM EST | 30 minutes |  FREE |  Beginner

Language learning occurs in steps. As a communication partner, you are crucial to helping your child develop language and communication. You model language for your child during daily activities, you respond to your child’s attempts to communicate, and you help them learn to say words in a more efficient way. But what do these steps look like when it comes to Alternative and Augmentative Communication (AAC)? We will explore three simple steps, with different everyday activities, to help you and your child learn to use his/her device more effectively at home: choosing words, planning a question or comment, and modeling on the device.

During this session we will outline these steps during a routine such as making things with different shapes and colors, like a card. Join us for an interactive session to help you and your child step into AAC.

 

AAC: Ready - Set - Goal! Part 1

February 10, 2021| 10:00 AM EST | 60 minutes |  FREE |  Beginner

Creating goals and measuring progress for individuals who use AAC can be a challenging process for a variety of reasons, including subtle growth, environmental and communication partner considerations, and differences in language growth for individuals who use AAC. While there are available goal banks to use, these still require tweaking and may not always be appropriate for individual clients. This course will provide participants with a goal writing framework, assessment tools, and resources so they have the skills to write meaningful goals for clients who use AAC. Participants will engage in goal writing in order to learn about the goal attainment scale, assessment with AAC considerations, and the linguistic and operational communicative competence. This course will help participants reflect on where their client is (baseline), where they want to go (goals), and how to get there (a plan).

 

AAC: Ready - Set - Goal! Part 2

February 11, 2021| 12:00 PM EST | 60 minutes |  FREE |  Intermediate

This course follows AAC: Ready – Set – GOAL! Part One. In Part Two, we will continue to address the unique challenges of writing goals for individuals who use AAC, including differences in language acquisition, environmental considerations, and communication partner considerations. Rather than reviewing a bank of goals, in this course, we will continue to use the goal attainment scale and SMART terminology as a framework for writing meaningful goals.  This course will pick up with covering the communicative competences for AAC, taking an in depth look at social and strategic communicative competencies. Participants will engage in goal writing in order to learn SMART terminology. We will discuss monitoring progress, as a goal is only as good as your ability to measure it. This course will help participants reflect on where their client is (baseline), where they want to go (goals), and how to get there (a plan). It is necessary for participants to take Part One prior to taking Part Two for understanding.